#elgoogo project – Violins in Wartime

violins Synopsis: Violins in Wartime is a documentary feature that was shot during the second Lebanon War in 2006. It follows a group of internationally acclaimed conductors who travelled to Israel for a month long workshop for young classical musicians from around the world. It's an annual event that takes place in Keshet Eilon, a kibbutz on the border of Lebanon. In 2006 the sound of violin concertos was suddenly muffled by the sounds of Kassam Missiles - the 2nd Lebanon war broke out... the story of music, classical art and war. Trailer Full Film Free to watch Facebook Food for thought... The film portrays the perseverance of a remarkable group of musicians: master artists and students, who continue teaching and practicing violin in spite of the on-going conflict. The artists struggle to keep worry at bay and thanks to the music they practice they are able to maintain their stability. The musicians are committed to keep on playing and carrying on with their music workshop no matter what is happening around them or the parent's displeasure with their children being in a war zone country. The film is a rare document portraying aspects of Israeli life seldom seen in the media, in which the violin becomes a symbol of abiding Jewish-Israeli resilience. This sentence stood out to me: "Pleasant sounds to the ear definitely give relief to the soul" As always, don't forget so share this documentary with your friends and family. Let's unite and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – Interviewing Matilde Germini

costantini Elgoog_no loghi Here is a question and answer with Matilde Germini, a 9-year-old girl in Rome. This question and answer was conducted for the purpose of gaining a fresh perspective on the Internet through a child's eye. Elgoogo wanted to understand how some young children use the Internet and what they think of the Internet. 1. What age did you first start using the computer? I was 8 years old. 2. What age did you first start using the Internet? I was 9 years old. 3. How did you learn to use the computer and the Internet? Was it through your parents, school, friends or by yourself? Through my mum, friends and by myself. 4. Everyday how much time do you spend on the Internet? 30 minutes per day. 5. Where do you use the Internet: at home, school, anywhere else? At my mum’s office and a little bit using the phone. 6. What do you use the Internet for? I use it for scholastic researches, to look for games, singers and actors. Explanations of something I do not know. Video tutorial for many things. 7. Do you talk to your friends using the Internet? Just through whatsapp. 8. What do you think of the Internet? Internet is a very useful tool but very dangerous if you don’t use it carefully. 9. Thinking about your homework, do you use the Internet? Can you tell me what you researched? Yes very often. If I don’t know the meaning of a word or I don’t understand an exercise. If something is not explained properly on the school book. 10. Do you have any social media accounts? I don’t use any social media, I'm still too young and my parents are very careful about my internet habit. 11. In the future, what do you think you will use the Internet for? I think I will always use the internet, it's very useful!
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#elgoogo project – Bla Cinima

bla cinima Synopsis: In a central square in Algiers, set in front of the "Sierra Maestra" cinema, recently refurbished but completely deserted, director Lamine Ammar-Khodja personally tries to talk about cinema with the people he meets: what must the movies show for viewers are they going to see them? Through this investigation and these spontaneous dialogues, the author gives the floor to the road and to a little known Algerian reality. Cinema is soon overwhelmed by life, while trying to tell it and reinvent it in that simple act but it's so difficult to film the word. Trailer Food for thought... The documentary reveals through both men and women of all ages, the reality faced by many Algerians. We see their culture and current struggles. By speaking on cinema, each individual reveals their dreams and ambitions. The cinema becomes the protagonist that reveals the daily life of these Algerians. The documentary also focuses on homelessness in Algiers. We see what homelessness can do to a family, young people who dream of going to university, having a career and owning a home. As always, don't forget to share this documentary with your friends and family. Let's unite and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – AL Karama

Synopsis: 'Al Karama' is the Arabic word for 'dignity'. The film explores the complexities of the Arab Spring through a multimedia approach. Note from the director: "In March and December 2011 I travelled along the shores of the Mediterranean sea capturing on video the fall of the regimes and the aftermath in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. I wanted to understand what was happening in those squares, why people were protesting and what they wanted to achieve. It was my first time in the Arab world, and my first time doing video-journalism. Dignity is the word I heard most often in taking short interviews and talking with the people. Dignity as an Arab, dignity as Muslims, dignity as human beings, they said" Trailer Food for thought... The documentary highlights the discrepancies between the big picture of the events and the reality of the people who were actually fighting in the streets for their freedom and their dignity: the ones who were suffering and struggling for the lack of opportunities, for the desire of a decent life. It shows the many structural problems faced by the country such as weak governance and unemployment. As always, don't forget to share this documentary with your friends and family. Let’s unite and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – Eurovillage

eurovillage Synopsis: Surrounded by the Ardennes forest, Eurovillage, a former holiday resort, was transformed in 2011 into an "open" reception center for asylum seekers, managed by the Red Cross. Isolated in this remote center for many months (some have been there for more than 2 years), what do the 300 residents who live there, do to support this agonizing wait, this suspended and empty moment, which, for a majority of them, will end with an "Order to Leave the Territory"? Eurovillage lifts a corner of the veil on the life of asylum seekers in Belgium. Trailer Facebook Food for thought... The camera captures intimacy and hopes undermined by the indefinite expectation of a decision that will change many fates. The documentary also touches on the concept of 'economic immigrants' and 'refugees'. An economic migrant is not a legal classification, but rather an umbrella term for a wide array of people that move from one country to another to advance their economic and professional prospects. The documentary shows a discussion on recent claims that some groups who fled their country are economic immigrants and not refugees, yet they are trying to get a refugee status. This discussion is interesting as it shows that although there is a distinction between an economic immigrant and a refugee, the motivations for both groups to risk their lives in desperate attempts to reach a specific country are often very similar. However, a question raised by many in this debate is 'who should bear the financial costs of those who are not refugees but economic immigrants? As always, don't forget to share this documentary with your friends and family. Let's unite and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – We cannot go there now my dear

we cannot go there Synopsis: Palestinian refugees have been living in Syria since they had been forced to flee Palestine in 1948. As the Syrian crisis intensifies, they alongside the Syrians have become affected by the war. Their story, however, is more complex. By fleeing Syria and seeking refuge in Lebanon they are becoming a special category of refugees: they are refugees twice over. As Palestinians, they are not entirely welcome in Lebanon. As refugees, their travel documents are not recognised. As Palestinians, this is the second time they lose everything and find themselves once more homeless and stateless. This documentary tells the story of those twice-over refugees. A story, where memories were awakened between one exodus and the other, and where loss invades all things striking the very self. A story, where the causes and consequences are known, but not the closure. A story, where lives are continuously being rebuilt and improvised awaiting their return. Trailer Facebook Food for thought... This documentary questions notions such as identity and home for people whose existence revolves around a feeling of constant loss. The director portrays the struggles faced by the Palestinian refugees and their search for identity and a sense of belonging where they do not feel at ease or at home. The documentary shows the dreams, yearnings and the political fights of Palestinians. As always, don't forget so share this documentary with your friends and family. Let's unite and #establishties .
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#elgoogo project – Waiting for the (t)rain

Poster Waiting for the (t)rain Synopsis: A small village lost in a dusty desert in Burkina's bush where two times a week a train passes. Various food items and water bottles thrown by the passengers while passing by constitute the main income of the village, and the only source of water during dry season. Different portraits follow each individuals of the village. The older ones have known slavery in the service of France, the young dream of distant horizons. Trailer Food for thought... This short but fascinating documentary has become another one of my favourites. The documentary shows numerous personal life stories where the individuals are all faced with the same limitation. It is beautiful to see and learn the differing thoughts and principles that guide all the individuals and help them overcome this limitation. This is an incredible documentary in the way it showcases the feelings of hope, anger, sympathy and empathy. As always, don't forget so share this documentary with your friends and family. Let's unite and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – Interviewing Gianni Massironi

13529036_1229427420423175_7110364227818259595_n On the 16th November I had the privilege to sit and have a very interesting discussion with the film director and producer Gianni Massironi. His notable work includes directing and producing many films and documentaries for the Italian television RAI. Mr Massironi has also worked with some of the most celebrated Italian directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Mark Peploe. I was honoured to meet with him to find out the role the media, including cinema and television, plays in the issue of hate speech. On asking Mr Massironi of his insight on hate speech, he firstly said that we must understand that media always transmits a point of view. The viewer must be aware that there is always an agenda behind any information broadcasted on newspapers, television and on the web. People can be manipulated on any platform and the exponential growth of hate speech on social platforms is an alarming example of the power of the media. Thanks to his experience and expertise of audio-visual means, he discussed an original approach that viewers can use to protect themselves from the manipulation of the media. This approach requires viewers to learn how to use their own special and personal ‘spectacles’ when absorbing information. He went to add that, as there are numerous ways in which audience can be controlled, it is very complex and difficult to pin point exactly where the problem of fake news and hate speech starts. Gianni Massironi, talking as a film director, proposed the paradox that we live in a permanent state of a ‘Truman show’ where the audience is the cast that is not faced with the real problems of the society. He emphasised that the media should be honest and should declare what they are trying to portray, but this is just a dream. It is common for media outlets to promote distortions and highlight specific scandalous aspects of stories to succeed in their aim of reaching a big audience. As a result, this behaviour enhances and promotes hate speech instead of tackling it. Showing bad practices and focusing on hate speech represent ways of exalting and glorifying unlawful acts which can invite and encourage individuals to imitate such crimes. He also mentioned the big problem created by classifying groups of people that then become stereotypes and consequently victims of hate speech. In addressing this problem, Mr Massironi, through an example, recommended how the media could dismantle stereotypes and, at the same time, suggest good behaviour to the crowd. The example is: imagine that an individual made a discriminatory remark about disabled people. This remark could result in violence and break communities. The media should not promote it, but should offer a positive vision of the victims, like producing a short video clip made by the disabled people. This would show that, even with their struggles, they can laugh and have fun and they also can be as creative as any other human being. This would be a counter speech! However, he highlighted that this rarely happens; yet it is common to see the focus on negative news to grab attention. What I learnt from this conversation is that it is extremely important to be aware of our own point of view when we are absorbing information from media platforms. We have to decide what ‘spectacles’ we are going to use ourselves, so we do not fall into the trap. As the saying goes, we must take everything with a ‘pinch of salt’!
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#elgoogo project – I Comme Iran

I comme iran Synopsis In Brussels, behind the closed doors of a classroom, using a textbook dating from the Islamic Revolution, a filmmaker learns how to read and write in Persian, her mother tongue. Over the course of the lessons, the teacher introduces the basics of the Persian language, which becomes a gateway to the history and culture of Iran. Gradually, the didactic method of the lessons evolves into a poetic, visual collage, which introduces the notion of freedom and questions the meaning of a revolution. Trailer Facebook Food for thought... This is another great documentary to watch. I liked that the documentary is filmed from a subjective angle of the camera; this puts us in the student's shoes, who is learning her mother tongue. We learn through her about the Islamic Revolution and at times feel her remorse and nostalgia. It's another captivating documentary in this genre. As always, don't forget so share this documentary with your friends and family. Lets untie and #establishties.
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#elgoogo project – The Free Voice of Egypt. Nawal El Saadawi

the free voice Synopsis: Nawal El Saadawi is a well-known writer, feminist and psychiatric doctor. The documentary charts the most important stages in the life of this extraordinary woman – a woman who risked her life for her convictions more than once, a woman who never gave up her mission despite death threats from fundamentalists and unspeakable conditions at the women's prison under President Sadat. Nawal El Saadawi's biography encompasses more than eight decades of contemporary Egyptian history as experienced from a female perspective. Trailer Food for thought... The documentary contains original quotations from Nawal El Saadawi's autobiographical works. It's woven in the documentary to create a vivid and dramatic interplay between the past and the present. It also highlight's Nawal El Saadawi's striking biography, which has outlived so many social and political ruptures. The documentary indicates that it is not just a matter of one woman's life. This is the reality of life as experienced by millions of women under masculine authority. Here is a quote that stuck with me from the documentary: "If your husband has a bad day, he will go home and beat his wife. If he is annoyed with his children, he will go and beat his wife. Everything is blamed on women. Everything" As always, don't forget so share this documentary with your friends and family. Lets untie and #establishties.
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